March 2000 Record Collector (247)

RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS THE ROAD TO SOCK-CESS!

JAMES R. BLANDFORD CELEBRATES THE RETURN OF THE FUNKY MONKS

Last year was a pivotal time for the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Four years on from the lukewarm reception that greeted the “One Hot Minute” LP, the band sorely needed a hit album. The previous two years had seen ex-Jane’s Addiction stalwart Dave Navarro quit the band to follow other projects, while singer Anthony Kiedis and drummer Chad Smith were both involved in motorbike accidents that resulted in the cancellation of several scheduled live appearances.

On top of this, it appeared that Navarro was trying to take the rest of the band with him, bassist Flea joining him on a Jane’s Addiction reunion tour while Smith clambered on board for an embryonic band named Spread. Kiedis appeared on MTV, admitting he had — once again — been using heroin, while John Frusciante —”Mother’s Milk” and “Blood Sugar Sex Magik” guitarist — was tracked down by an LA newspaper and found to be hopelessly addicted to drugs, losing his teeth and hair and covered in sores. One might be forgiven for surmising that these were not the best omens for the band’s continued success .. .

Then came “Californication”, the come-back album to die for, and its blisteringly beautiful single “Scar Tissue”. Having shifted over three million units to date, the album looks set to be the band’s biggest seller yet, while a string of festival appearances in ’99 have shown them at the peak of their powers. Perhaps the greatest surprise has been the return of John Frusciante, miraculously back on top form. We trace the story of the Peppers’ evolution …

FAIRFAX ANTHEM

In late 1977, Anthony Kiedis joined the Hollywood-based Fairfax High School, an establishment whose alumni list boasts the likes of Phil Spector, Jerry Leiber and Herb Alpert. Stepping in to stop another pupil beating up a close friend one day, Anthony found himself facing Michael Balzary, also known as Flea. The two hit it off immediately, and spent the next couple of years experimenting with sex and drugs with typical youthful abandon.

At the same time, fellow Fairfax pupils, Californian native Jack Irons and Israeli-born Hillel Slovak — both die-hard Kiss fans who emulated their heroes at every opportunity — were members of High School group Anthem. Comprising Alain Johannes on vocals, Todd Strasman on bass, Irons on drums and Slovak on guitar, the band performed a set-list made up of Queen, Kiss and Zeppelin standards. 1980 saw the band change their name to Anthym — under pressure from an established local band with the same name — and bassist Todd Strasman quitting in favour of law school. The obvious replacement was Flea, who had taught himself to play, and it wasn’t long before Anthony Kiedis was brought on board as an MC, reading his off-the-wall poetry before introducing the group.

Anthym were now quite an attraction at the same night-clubs they were too young to get into, though one incident saw them bottled by neo-Nazis while supporting Oingo Boingo at the Orange County Fair. Nevertheless, the band’s confidence won out, and they found themselves regularly headlining at local night-club Starwood. The Chili Peppers’ first incarnation was not destined for longevity, however, and Flea left the group to join punk group Fear, famed for their outrageous live shows. It was at one of Fear’s shows that Flea was noticed by Johnny Rotten, who persuaded him to audition as a replacement for recently-departed PiL bassist Jah Wobble. He ultimately declined.

WHAT IS THIS?

Meanwhile, Slovak and Irons had stayed with Anthym, renaming themselves What Is This? Kiedis continued his role as MC, although the band slowly fizzled out as the four friends went their separate ways. It was spring 1983 before any further developments occurred, when Kiedis was offered a one-off slot opening a show by Gary Allen at the Rhythm Lounge. Jamming at his apartment with Flea, Anthony began to recite a poem he had penned, “Out In LA”, to Flea’s repeated riff — the first song by what would soon become the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

The duo recruited Jack Irons and Slovak from What Is This? to flesh out their performance, downed a tab of acid and took to the stage as Tony Flow and the Miraculously Majestic Masters Of Mayhem. For all of four minutes. To the amazement of the group, the audience and management at the Rhythm Lounge were so impressed they immediately offered the band a headline slot —as long as they could come up with some more songs. The next time they played there was a queue round the block and the four musicians had chosen their new name: the Red Hot Chili Peppers, inspired — apparently — by a “psychedelic bush” in the Hollywood Hills. Although Flea, Irons and Slovak continued their involvement with other bands for some time, they were slowly realising that their uniquely unfashionable blend of punk and funk could be leading them somewhere.

THE ROAD TO STARDOM …

The group gigged prolifically over the next few months, making their most infamous appearance at the Kit Kat club, a strip joint where various scantily-clad lovelies danced about while the band performed. Annoyed at not being the focus of attention, the band played a mediocre set and left the stage, returning to play their encore — a cover of Jimi Hendrix’s “Fire” — naked apart from strategically placed socks. The manoeuvre may have paid off publicity-wise, but it was an act that would haunt the group for years to come, as attention focused on the “cocks in socks” rather than on the music.

Nevertheless, word spread and within six months of the Tony Flow gig, the Red Hot Chili Peppers found themselves signed to EMI America, thanks to a demo tape recorded by Mark ‘Rooster’ Richardson which included the tracks “Out In LA”, -Get Up And Jump”, “Green Heaven”, “Sex Rap” and “Baby Appeal”.

The Chili Peppers’ eponymously-titled debut was recorded without Irons and Slovak, who decided to stick with What Is This? rather than risk going with the band they perceived to be a joke. Jack Sherman (guitar) and ex-Captain Beefheart drummer Cliff Martinez were brought in as temporary replacements, and the album was produced by the Gang Of Four’s Andy Gill. Unfortunately the relationship between Gill and the band was strained at best, resulting in a decidedly mediocre album. The LP did boast some flashes of Chili originality, most notably “True Men Don’t Kill Coyotes” — a rap against the wild animal shootings that were taking place in the Hollywood Hills. Unsurprisingly, “Red Hot Chili Peppers” didn’t make much of an impact, so the band embarked on their first US tour in an attempt to conquer the waiting masses.

HEROIN HELL

It was during this tour that Anthony and Flea became aware of their dislike for Jack Sherman, who preferred to stay at home and relax than go out partying. Sherman was asked to leave by January 1984, and Hillel Slovak — who was disillusioned with the lack of success of What Is This? — was invited back on board. He officially reunited with the Chilis in January 1985. Unfortunately, however, as their star ascended, so did Anthony and Hillel’s heroin abuse, which was now fast spiralling out of control.

On tour, and with the failure of their debut still fresh in their memories, the Peppers had written enough new material to fill a second album. Inspired by the great funk albums such as “America Eats Its Young”, the group decided to ask “Dr. Funkenstein himself’ — George Clinton — to produce the second LP, “Freaky Styley”. To their delight, he accepted, inviting them to record at his United Sound Studio in Detroit. The result was an improvement on their debut, although it still lacked the live energy for which the band were now renowned. However, their lustful side had come very much to the fore, courtesy of tracks such as “Catholic Schoolgirls Rule”, “Sex Rap”, “Blackeyed Blonde” and “Thirty Dirty Birds”. The group took to the road once again, and the column inches began to fill — Glenn O’Brien wrote in People magazine: ” ‘Freaky Styley’ is the first record of the rest of your life”. Things within the band were less rosy, though . . .

The “Freaky Styley” tour ran from October ’85 through to March ’86, and was to be the last tour with Cliff Martinez, who had somehow managed to remain behind the drum kit since the “Red Hot Chili Peppers” sessions. Anthony and Flea decided to re-recruit Jack Irons, who hadn’t played with them since the Rhythm Lounge gig, though Flea’s motivations in grabbing Irons were not quite the same as Anthony’s — Irons’ dislike of drug abuse was common knowledge, and Kiedis and Slovak’s heroin consumption was getting seriously out of hand. Kiedis seemed able to handle his addiction with some degree of control, whereas the secretive Slovak was often either late for gigs or unconscious, meaning that the band had to play as a three-piece or simply cancel.

The relationship with EMI America was also becoming strained, and the label’s LA headquarters decided to hand control of the band over to EMI Manhattan. Simultaneously, in an attempt to distance himself from the drug abuse consuming his friends, Flea opted to follow a number of solo projects, including two tracks with ex-PiL guitarist Keith Levine for the “Violent Opposition” EP. He also proposed to and married his girlfriend Loesha, whose name can still be seen tattooed around his left nipple. The marriage did not last.

ABBEY ROAD

The tricky third album, “The Uplift Mofo Party Plan”, did not get off to a good start. Renowned producer Rick Rubin — later to work with the band on 1992’s “Blood Sugar Sex Magik” — walked out of a meeting with the group after a mere 60 minutes, bemoaning their lack of organisation and trust. EMI then called in Michael Beinhorn — who had worked with Herbie Hancock and Nona Hendryx — to sort things out. May ’87 saw the Peppers finally enter Capitol Studios in Los Angeles to complete the third album, and within two months of its release it had sold more copies than the first two albums put together — helped rather than hindered by the ‘Parental Advisory’ sticker on the cover, thanks to `Party On Your Pussy”. Featuring “Fight Like A Brave”, the eco-friendly “Behind The Sun” and an unusual take on Bob Dylan’s “Subterranean Homesick Blues”, the album swiftly drew comparisons with the Beastie Boys and was the Peppers’ first LP to dent the US charts, reaching No. 148. This minor success prompted their debut European tour in support of the “Abbey Road” EP, the sleeve of which was a pastiche of the famous Beatles album cover, only this time the Peppers proudly sported nothing other than socks on their cocks. The lead track on the EP, “Fire”, was originally recorded for “Freaky Styley”, but was left off at the last minute. Boosted by the European success, the band returned to Los Angeles to start work on the next album. Within four weeks, the 25-year-old Hillel Slovak was dead of a heroin overdose.

MOTHER’S MILK

Slovak’s death affected the Peppers deeply. Kiedis vanished to Mexico to clean up and relationships were so strained that Flea considered regrouping the Chilis without Anthony. Irons was hit worst of all, withdrawing from the band and refusing even to answer the phone. He was later admitted to a psychiatric unit for treatment.

This could have been the end, but Flea and Anthony decided to set about replacing Irons and Slovak. Ex-George Clinton guitarist Duane Blackbyrd McKnight and former Dead Kennedys drummer D.H. Peligro were brought in for a September ’88 MTV show, 120 Minutes, though they were dismissed within weeks. Their next choice of a guitarist was 18-year-old John Frusciante, one of the band’s biggest fans, who they knew personally on account of his regular attendance at their gigs. Initially suggesting he audition for another band, Thelonius Monk, Anthony and Flea were so impressed with his abilities that they decided to bag him for themselves. At the same time, they chanced across Chad Smith, whose pitch for the drummer’s vacancy included him shouting obscenities as he trashed the kit. He was hired.

In March ’89, the new line-up hit the road before returning to the studio to cut their fourth album, tentatively entitled “Rocking Freakapotomus”. “Mother’s Milk” — the final title — was officially launched in August ’89 to rave reviews. Playboy referred to it as “the most dynamic punk funk connection you’re likely to hear for a long time,” while in the UK, Kerrang! described it as “stylish . . . irresistible .. . punishing”. Guitar Player also heaped praise upon newcomer Frusciante, describing him as “a living archive of 70s metal and funk riffs”.

Containing a song dedicated to Hillel Slovak, “Knock Me Down” — the lead single which made it to No. 4 in the Billboard chart — the album also featured a Slovak painting of a reclining nude on the back sleeve. Sauce was still evident in abundance on “Sexy Mexican Maid” while more unusual tracks included a tribute to the LA Lakers’ basketball star, “Magic Johnson”. The journey had seen drug addiction and death, but the Peppers had finally arrived. Another tour followed, the end of which would find them in 1990, stuck in LA and wondering where to turn to next. The band were fed up of EMI and managed to buy their way out of their contract, which demanded another three albums. Manager Lindy Goetz then instigated a bidding war amongst the major labels, which ended up with a head-to-head between Epic and WEA — Epic briefly won out, but after phoning the band members personally, Mo Ostin, head of Warners, clinched the deal. The price? Around $7 million.

BLOOD SUGAR SEX MAGIK

Now was the most opportune moment to get back into the studio to capitalise on their new-found success. Rick Rubin was called in again and the band moved into a rented haunted house in Laurel Canyon. Previous occupants were said to have included Rudolph Valentino, Harry Houdini, Jimi Hendrix and the Beatles. The album took two months to record and mix and was released in September 1991 to widespread critical acclaim, eventually clocking up sales of over two million. Rick Rubin may have been more used to heavy metal acts, but he had managed to coax two ballads, “My Lovely Man” — a love song to Hillel Slovak — and “Under The Bridge” out of the Chilis, as well as a slick lead single, “Give It Away”, which would earn the group an award for Best Hard Rock Track With Vocal at the 1992 MTV Video Music Awards. The album was officially certified platinum in April ’92, while the success of “Under The Bridge” prompted a sell-out tour of Japan and Australia. It was on May 7th, in the middle of the Japanese tour, that John Frusciante, ground down by the stress and fatigue of being a 21-year-old in the public eye, decided to quit the band. The Australian dates were cancelled and the dejected band returned to LA to find Frusciante’s replacement.

Two more guitarists, Arik Marshall and Jesse Tobias, came and went before the Chili Peppers succeeded in bagging ex-Jane’s Addiction guitarist Dave Navarro. The new line-up debuted at Woodstock ’94, with (much to Navarro’s annoyance) lightbulbs on their head! Headline slots through-out Europe followed, including a storming show at the Reading Festival, but the fans were still awaiting the sixth studio album. When it eventually came, in September ’95, the wait didn’t seem that worthwhile. ONE HOT FINISH? “One Hot Minute” was previewed to the public with lead single “Warped”, in which Kiedis sang painfully about his drug addiction: “My tendency for dependency / is offending me / is upending me / I’m pretending, see, to be strong and free / from my dependency / it’s warping me”. Chartwise, the killer single didn’t fare that well, although follow-ups “My Friends” and “Aeroplane” benefited from copious MTV and Radio 1 airplay. Overall, the album seemed to lack some of the energy of earlier releases and a lacklustre show at Wembley Arena in early ’96 saw a band who seemed hardly on speaking terms — Kerrang! revealed that the members had turned up in separate limos, while Kiedis and Navarro themselves hinted that the band might not continue for much longer.

Sure enough, the Peppers went their separate ways for the next few years, leaving many fans wondering if the band had indeed split up. However, a ’98 appearance at the Mount Fuji Festival in Japan quashed such speculation while rumours placed the band in an LA studio putting the finishing touches to a new album. The first taste of this came in May .’99 with “Scar Tissue” — such a radio-friendly track that it’s still receiving blanket airplay on Radio 1 and London’s Xfm in January 2000 — while “Californication” followed a month later. Having already trounced initial sales of “Blood Sugar Sex Magik”, “Californication” seems set to prove that the Chilis aren’t spent yet. As for the guitarist situation, let’s just hold our breath …

RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS COMPLETE UK DISCOGRAPHY

** I think this is accurate but please double check if you use it! I didn’t add the value given in the chart) **

 UK SINGLES

EMI America EA 205  –  HOLLYWOOD (AFRICA)/NEVER MIND (7?; 8/85)

EMI America 12EA 205 — HOLLYWOOD (AFRICA) (remix)/HOLLYWOOD (AFRICA) (dub mix)/NEVER MIND (12?; 8/55)

EMI America EA 241 — 12 FIGHT LIKE A BRAVE (LP version)/FIRE (7?; 1/88)

EMI America 12EA 241– FIGHT LIKE A BRAVE (LP version)/(Mofo Mix)/(Knucklehead Mix)/FIRE (12”, p/s 1/88)

EMI America 12EAP 241 — FIGHT LIKE A BRAVE (LP version)/(Mofo Mix)/(Knucklehead Mix)/FIRE (12? picture disc; 1/88)

EMI Manhattan MT 41 — THE ABBEY ROAD EP: BACKWOODS/HOLLYWOOD (AFRICA) TRUE MEN DON’T KILL COYOTES (7?, p/s; 5/58)

EMI Manhattan 12MT 41 — THE ABBEY ROAD EP: BACKWOODS/HOLLYWOOD (AFRICA)/TRUE MEN DON’T KILL COYOTES/CATHOLIC  SCHOOL GIRLS RULE (12”; p/s;5/88)

EMI Manhattan MT 41 — THE ABBEY ROAD EP: BACKWOODS/HOLLYWOOD (AFRICA) TRUE MEN DON’T KILL COYOTES/ CATHOLIC  SCHOOL GIRLS RULE (CD; 5/58)

EMI Manhattan MT 70 — KNOCK ME DOWN/PUNK ROCK CLASSIC/PRETTY LITTLE DITTY (7?; p/s, 8/89)

EMI Manhattan MTPD– KNOCK ME DOWN/PUNK ROCK CLASSIC/PRETTY LITTLE DITTY (7? shaped picture disc with insert; 8/89)

EMI Manhattan 12MT 70–  KNOCK ME DOWN/PUNK ROCK CLASS1C/SPECIAL SECRET SONG INSIDE/MAGIC JOHNSON (12? p/s; 11/89)

EMI Manhattan CDMT 70– KNOCK ME DOWN/PUNK ROCK CLASSIC/MAGIC JOHNSON/ JUNGLE MAN (CD, 8/89)

EMI Manhattan MT 75 –HIGHER GROUND/MILLIONAIRES AGAINST HUNGER (7”; p/s ,11/89, No. 55)

EMI Manhattan 12MT 75– HIGHER GROUND (Munchkin Mix)/(Dub Mix)/POLITICIAN (MINI RAP)/MOMMY WHERE’S DADDY (12?; p/s;11/89)

EMI Manhattan 12MTX 75 — HIGHER GROUND/(Munchkin Mix)/(Dub Mix /POLITICIAN (MINI RAP)/ MOMMY WHERE’S DADDY (12? pop-out ‘chilli pepper’ p/s; 11/89)

EMI Manhattan CDMT 75– HIGHER GROUND/(Munchkin Mix)/MILLIONAIRES AGAINST HUNGER/MOMMY WHERE’S DADDY (CD; 11/89)

EMI Manhattan MT 85 –TASTE THE PAIN/SHOW ME YOUR SOUL (7?;p/s 6/90. No. 29)

EMI Manhattan TCMT 85 –TASTE THE PAIN/SHOW ME YOUR SOUL (cassette. 6/90)

EMI Manhattan 10MT 85 –TASTE THE PAIN/SHOW ME YOUR SOUL/ CASTLES MADE OF SAND (live) (square disc, no’d,  6/90)

EMI Manhattan 12MTX  85 –TASTE THE PAIN/SHOW ME YOUR SOUL/1F YOU WANT ME TO STAY/NEVER MIND (12? remix,. Pop-out p/s. 6/90)

EMI Manhattan CDMT 85 –TASTE THE PAIN/SHOW ME YOUR SOUL/ CASTLES MADE OF SAND (live)/NEVER MIND (CD; 6/90)

EMI Manhattan MT 88 HIGHER GROUND / FIGHT LIKE A BRAVE (7″, p/s, 8/90, No. 54)

EMI Manhattan 12MT 88 HIGHER GROUND (Daddy 0 Mix) / (LP version) / FIGHT LIKE A BRAVE (12″, gatefold pop-up p/s, 8/90)

EMI Manhattan 12MTPD 88 HIGHER GROUND (Daddy 0 Mix) / (LP version) / FIGHT LIKE A BRAVE (12″ picture disc, insert, 8/90)

EMI Manhattan CDMT 88 HIGHER GROUND / BEHIND THE SUN / FIGHT LIKE A BRAVE / OUT IN L.A. (CD, 8/90)

WEA WO 084 UNDER THE BRIDGE / GIVE IT AWAY (Single Mix) (7″, p/s, 3/92, No. 26)

WEA WO 084 W UNDER THE BRIDGE / GIVE IT AWAY (Single Mix) (7″, with enamel badge, 3/92)

WEA WO 084 C UNDER THE BRIDGE / GIVE IT AWAY (Single Mix) (cassette, 3/92)

WEA WO 084 T UNDER THE BRIDGE / SEARCH AND DESTROY / SOUL TO SQUEEZE / SIKAMIKANICO (12″, p/s, 3/92)

WEA WO 084 CD UNDER THE BRIDGE / SEARCH AND DESTROY / SOUL TO SQUEEZE / SIKAMIKANICO (CD, 3/92)

WEA WO 110 T IF YOU HAVE TO ASK (Disco Krisco Mix) / (LP version) / (Scott & Garth Mix) / FELA’S COCK (12″, unreleased, 4/92)

WEA WO 110 CD IF YOU HAVE TO ASK (Radio Edit) / (Disco Krisco Mix) / (Scott & Garth Mix) / FELA’S COCK (CD. unreleased, 4/92)

WEA WO 126 BREAKING THE GIRL / FELA’S COCK (7″, p/s, 7/92, No. 41)

WEA WO 126 C BREAKING THE GIRL / FELA’S COCK (cassette, 7/92)

WEA WO 126 TW BREAKING THE GIRL / FELA’S COCK / SUCK MY KISS (live) / I COULD HAVE LIED (live) (12″, p/s, 7/92)

WEA WO 126 CDX BREAKING THE GIRL / FELA’S COCK / SUCK MY KISS (live) / I COULD HAVE LIED (live) (CD, with Lollapalooza sticker, 7/92)

WEA WO 188 C GIVE IT AWAY (Edit) / IF YOU HAVE TO ASK (Friday Night Fever Blister Mix) (cassette, 6/93)

WEA WO 188 TP GIVE IT AWAY (Single Mix) / (12″ Mix) / (Rasta Mix) / IF YOU HAVE TO ASK (Friday Night Fever Blister Mix) (12″, p/s, 6/93)

WEA WO 188 CD1 GIVE IT AWAY (Single Mix) / (12″ Mix) / (Rasta Mix) / IF YOU HAVE TO ASK (Friday Night Fever Blister Mix) (CD, 6/93)

WEA WO 188 CD2      GIVE IT AWAY (Edit) / IF YOU HAVE TO ASK (Disco Krisco Mix) / (Scott & Garth Mix) / (LP version) (CD, 6/93)

WEA WO 225 C GIVE IT AWAY (Edit) / SOUL TO SQUEEZE (cassette, 1/94, No. 9)

WEA WO 225 T GIVE IT AWAY (12″ Mix) / (Rasta Mix) / IF YOU HAVE TO ASK (Disco Krisco Mix) (12″, p/s, 1/94)

WEA WO 225 CD1 GIVE IT AWAY (Single Mix) / (12″ Mix) / (Rasta Mix) / SOUL TO SQUEEZE (CD, no’d fold-out digipak with space for 2nd CD, 1/f

WEA WO 225 CD2 GIVE IT AWAY (Edit) / IF YOU HAVE TO ASK (Friday Night Fever Blister Mix) / (Scott & Garth Mix) / NOBODY WEIRD LIKE ME (live) (CD, 1/94)

WEA WO 237 UNDER THE BRIDGE / SUCK MY KISS (7″, blue vinyl, p/s, 3/94, No. 13)

WEA WO 237 C UNDER THE BRIDGE / SUCK MY KISS (cassette, 3/94)

WEA WO 237 CD UNDER THE BRIDGE / FELA’S COCK / I COULD HAVE LIED (live) / GIVE IT AWAY (In Progress) (CD, 3/94)

WEA WO 237 CDX UNDER THE BRIDGE / SIKAMIKANICO / SUCK MY KISS / SEARCH AND DESTROY (live) (CD, no’d case with 3 postcards, 3/94) . .

WEA WO 316 C WARPED (Edit) / PEA (cassette, 8/95, No. 31)

WEA WO 316 CD WARPED (Edit) / PEA / MELANCHOLY MECHANICS (CD, 8/95)

WEA WO 317 X MY FRIENDS / COFFEE SHOP (7″, p/s, 10/95, No. 29)

WEA WO 317 C MY FRIENDS / COFFEE SHOP (cassette, 10/95)

WEA WO 317 C MY FRIENDS / LET’S MAKE EVIL (cassette, 10/95)

WEA WO 317 TX MY FRIENDS / COFFEE SHOP / LET’S MAKE EVIL / STRETCH (12″, with poster, p/s, 10/95)

WEA WO 317 CD MY FRIENDS / COFFEE SHOP / LET’S MAKE EVIL / STRETCH (CD, 10/95)

WEA WO 331 C AEROPLANE / SUFFRAGETTE CITY (live) (cassette, 2/96, No. 11)

WEA WO 331 CD AEROPLANE / BACKWOODS (live) / TRANSCENDING (live) / ME AND MY FRIENDS (live) (CD, 2/96)

WEA WO 331 CDX AEROPLANE / SUCK MY KISS (live) / SUFFRAGETTE CITY (live) (CD, with 3D album sleeve postcard & case, 2/96)

Geffen GFS 22188 LOVE ROLLERCOASTER / LESBIAN SEAGULL (by Engelbert Humperdinck) (7″, p/s, 5/97, No. 7)

Geffen GFSC 22188 LOVE ROLLERCOASTER / LESBIAN SEAGULL (by Engelbert Humperdinck) (cassette, 5/97)

Geffen GFSTD 22188 LOVE ROLLERCOASTER / LESBIAN SEAGULL (by Engelbert Humperdinck) (CD, 5/97)

WEA W 490 C SCAR TISSUE / GONG LI (cassette, 5/99)

WEA W 490 CD SCAR TISSUE / GONG LI / INSTRUMENTAL No. 1 (CD, 5/99)

WEA W 500 C AROUND THE WORLD / YERTLE THE TURTLE (cassette, 7/99)

WEA W 500 CD1 AROUND THE WORLD / PARALLEL UNIVERSE / TEATRO JAM (CD, 7/99)

WEA W 500 CD2 AROUND THE WORLD / ME AND MY FRIENDS / YERTLE THE TURTLE (CD, 7/99)

WEA W 510 CD1 OTHERSIDE / HOW STRONG / ROAD TRIPPIN’ (Without Strings) (CD, 12/99)

WEA W 510 CD2 OTHERSIDE / MY LOVELY MAN (enhanced CD, 12/99)

 

ORIGINAL UK ALBUMS

EMI America AML 3125 — UPLIFT MOFO PARTY PLAN (LP,3/88)

EMI America CDAML 3125 — UPLIFT MOFO PARTY PLAN (CD, 3/88)

EMI Manhattan MTL 3125– MOTHER’S MILK (LP 5/89)

EMI Manhattan CDMTL 3125– MOTHER’S MILK (CD 5/89)

EMI Manhattan MTL 1056 — THE RED HOT CHILLI PEPPERS (LP 8/90, originally US. Only)

EMI Manhattan CDMTL 1056 — THE RED HOT CHILLI PEPPERS (CD 8/90, originally US. Only)

EMI Manhattan MTL 1057 –FREAKY STYLEY (LP 8/90, originally US. only)

EMI Manhattan CDMTL 1057 –FREAKY STYLEY (CD 8/90, originally US. only)

WEA WX 441 BLOOD SUGAR SEX MAGIK (LP, 9/91, No. 25)

WEA 759926681 2 BLOOD SUGAR SEX MAGIK (CD, 9/91)

WEA 759926681 8 BLOOD SUGAR SEX MAGIK (MiniDisc, 4/93)

EMI MTL 1071 WHAT HITS? (LP, 10/92, No. 23)

EMI CDP 794762 2 WHAT HITS? (CD, 10/92)

EMI MTL 1082 OUT IN LA (LP, 11/94, No. 61)

EMI CDMTL 1082 OUT IN LA (CD, 11/94)

WEA 936245733 1 ONE HOT MINUTE (2-LP, 9/95, No. 2)  , No. 2)

WEA 936245733 2 ONE HOT MINUTE (CS, 9/95)

WEA 936247386 1 CALIFORNICATION (LP, 6/99)

WEA 936247386 2 CALIFORNICATION (CD, 6/99)

WEA 936247386 8 CALIFORNICATION (Mini Disc, 11/99)

 

REISSUED UK ALBUMS

EMI CDP 7480362  UPLIFT MOFO PARTY PLAN (CD, 1995)

Fame CDFA 3297 THE RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS (CD, 5/93)

EMI CDP 7906162 THE RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS (CD, 1995)

Fame CDFA 3309 FREAKY STYLEY (CD, 5/93)

EMI CDP 7906172 FREAKY STYLEY (CD, 1995)

 

CD BOX SETS

WEA 9362414052 LIVE RARE REMIX (France, 3 x CD EPs, 1994)

WEA 9362456492 THE PLASMA SHAFT (Australia, includes “BSSM” & bonus disc, 10/94)

EMI America CDOMB 004 THE ORIGINALS (UK, includes “Red Hot Chili Peppers”, “Freaky Styley” and “The Uplift Mofo Party Plan”, 10/95)

IMPORTANT OVERSEAS RELEASES

EMI America E2 50285 UNBRIDLED FUNK AND ROLL 4 YOUR SOUL: TASTE THE PAIN / MILLIONAIRES AGAINST HUNGER / CASTLES (live) / HIGHER GROUND (Daddy 0 Mix) (USA, CD, 1989)

EMI Australia 8803642 THE CHILI DIGI: BEHIND THE SUN / HIGHER GROUND (Pearly 12″) / IF YOU WANT ME TO STAY (Pink Mustang Mix) / TASTE THE PAIN (Australia, CD, digipak, 1992)

WEA 9362 40473 2 SUCK MY KISS / SEARCH AND DESTROY / FELA’S COCK (Australia, CD, tour souvenir, 1992)

WEA 9362 40840 2     IF YOU HAVE TO ASK (Radio Edit) / (Disco Krisco Mix) / (Scott & Garth Mix) / GIVE IT AWAY (live) (Germany, CD, 1993)

WEA 9362 45733 2 ONE HOT MINUTE (Australia, 2-CD, includes bonus One Hot Interview” disc, 10/95)

WEA 9362 43748 9 COFFEE SHOP / (live) / GIVE IT AWAY (live) (Germany, card p/s, 1996)

Ultradisc 683 MOTHER’S MILK (USA, remastered gold CD, 10/96)

EMI-Capitol 9413 9 UNDER THE COVERS (USA, CD, digipak & booklet in slipcase, 3/98)

WEA 9362 47487 2  CALIFORNICATION (Australia 2-CD, includes bonus 3-track CD, 1999)

IMPORTANT PROMO RELEASES

EMI America SOCK-CESS (UK CD, card p/s, 1989)

EMI America SPRO 4896   HIGHER GROUND (Freckle Noise Mix) / (B. G. Dub Mix) / (Pearly 12″) / IF YOU WANT ME TO STAY (Jingle Hell Mix) / (Instrumental) (USA, 12″, 1989)

EMI America SPRO 4899 HIGHER GROUND / (Lawnges Mix) / (Sheep Dub) / (Pearly 12″) / (Getaway Sticks Mix) (USA, 12″, 1989)

WEA 1732 EN CONCIERTO (Spain, 3-track CD, card p/s, 1993)

EMI RHCD 1   WHAT PROMO HITS?! (UK, CD, card p/s, 10/94)

WEA PRO CD 7878 R ONE HOT MINUTE (USA, ‘clean’ CD, stickered case, 10/95)

WEA 45733-2-DJ ONE HOT MINUTE (USA, CD, 3-D case, 10/95)

JJJ RHCP-J JJJ PRESENTS (Australia, 5-track live CD, card p/s, 5/96)

Geffen GED 76038 LOVE ROLLERCOASTER (Clean Edit) / (Rock Rollercoaster Mix) / (LP Version) (Spain, CD, 1997)

WEA CHILI 1 CD CALIFORNICAT!ON ALBUM SAMPLER (USA, CD-R, title sleeve, 6/99)

 

 With thanks to Vinyl Tap. 

 

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